The relationship between maternal and neonatal vitamin B12 and folate levels, anthropometric measurements, and metabolic indicators

Authors

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.28982/josam.669066

Keywords:

Pregnancy, Vitamin B12, Folate, Neonates, Insulin resistance, Metabolic indicators

Abstract

Aim: The nutritional imbalances in pregnancy may lead to metabolic problems in newborns, which may cause obesity during childhood and later in life. It is aimed to determine the maternal levels of folate, vitamin B12 at birth and to investigate the correlation between neonatal anthropometric measurements, and metabolic indicators such as serum lipid profile and insulin resistance.

Methods: A total of 102 mothers and newborns were enrolled in this prospective cohort study. The demographic, obstetric features, serum levels of vitamin B12, folate, glucose, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), triglycerides, cholesterol, insulin, homocysteine, and homeostatic model assessment (HOMA-IR) were noted. For vitamin B12, levels, ≥191 ng/L were accepted as normal. The correlation between maternal levels of vitamin B12, folate, anthropometric measurements, and metabolic indicators of newborns were evaluated. 

Results: Body mass index (P=0.004), serum insulin levels (P=0.012), HOMA-IR (P=0.001), and homocysteine (P=0.001) were increased in neonates born from mothers with lower serum levels of vitamin B12. The maternal vitamin B12 levels were positively, strongly correlated with neonatal vitamin B12 levels (r=0.719, P<0.001). There was an inverse, weak correlation between maternal vitamin B12 levels and neonatal serum insulin levels (r=-0.221, P=0.025), HOMA-IR (r=-0.249, P=0.011), and homocysteine (r=-0.394, P<0.001). Maternal folate levels were strongly, positively correlated with neonatal folate (r=0.735, P<0.001); weakly, positively correlated with neonatal vitamin B12 (r=0.327, P=0.001); moderately, inversely correlated with neonatal homocysteine (r=-0.505, P<0.001).

Conclusion: Optimizing intake of these vitamins levels during pregnancy is important to reduce the neonatal metabolic abnormalities, which may lead to obesity later in life.

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Published

2020-01-02

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Research Article

How to Cite

1.
Ünsür E, Kınaş B, Kutlusoy F, Aksoy Ülkü, Şahin K, Ünsür T, Aksoy H, Tekkeşin N. The relationship between maternal and neonatal vitamin B12 and folate levels, anthropometric measurements, and metabolic indicators. J Surg Med [Internet]. 2020 Jan. 2 [cited 2022 Jun. 26];4(1):43-7. Available from: https://jsurgmed.com/article/view/669066

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