Treatment of allopurinol-induced toxic epidermal necrolysis with high dose corticosteroids and intravenous immunoglobulins

Authors

Keywords:

Toxic epidermal necrolysis, SCORTEN, Allopurinol, IVIg, Methylprednisolone

Abstract

Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) is an uncommon, acute and severe adverse reaction triggered by drugs, infections and malignancies. Drugs are the main cause of the disease. The most common drugs are sulfonamides and penicillins and the most often associated infectious agent is herpes simplex virus. Allopurinol is the first line drug for serum lowering therapy in gout and is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). In recent studies, allopurinol was found to be the most commonly associated drug causing life-threatening drug reactions. Here, we aimed to present a rare case of TEN induced by allopurinol, the efficacy/harm of high dose systemic corticosteroids and use of intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg) in the treatment of TEN

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References

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Published

2019-07-29

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Section

Case Report

How to Cite

1.
Kaya İslamoğlu ZG, Akyürek M. Treatment of allopurinol-induced toxic epidermal necrolysis with high dose corticosteroids and intravenous immunoglobulins. J Surg Med [Internet]. 2019 Jul. 29 [cited 2022 Aug. 8];3(7):530-2. Available from: https://jsurgmed.com/article/view/540023